adhesive paper

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adhesive paper

Postby BlueWater on Mon Dec 05, 2011 6:27 pm

Adhesives for Paper

Adhesives are used for many purposes other than simply gluing one piece of paper to another. Some are good for producing glossy and/or matte surfaces. Some can help stiffen a thin decorative paper. Many adhesives can be pigmented. And some are used as sizing agents in producing effective surfaces for watercolors or inks.

Although it may seem like common sense, choosing the right adhesive for the right project can actually become quite confusing, especially when dealing with fine or decorative papers. Most paper, as we learned last week, is very easy to damage, and its various surfaces are sometimes tricky to manipulate. Whatever adhesive you end up choosing - for display boards, collage, bookbinding, sizing, etc. - the bond should be strong and last for a long time.

An adhesive, or glue, is a mixture in a liquid or semi-liquid state that adheres or bonds items together. Adhesives come from either natural or synthetic sources. The types of materials that can be bonded are vast but they are especially useful for bonding thin materials.

Adhesives are advantageous for joining thin or dissimilar materials, minimizing weight, and when a vibration dampening joint is needed.A disadvantage of most adhesives is that most do not form an instantaneous joint, unlike many other joining processes, because the adhesive needs time to cure.
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Re: adhesive paper

Postby BlueWater on Mon Dec 05, 2011 6:28 pm

Rubber Cement

Rubber cement creates a strong bond between paper and hard surfaces like card or illustration board. It will also effectively bond paper to metal, glass, and wood. It is impervious to water, but not to solvent-based products, such as some inks. (As a result, rubber cement can be used as a resist in watercolor and acrylic painting, but not when using oils and turpentine.) Rubber cement dries quickly, gives a flexible bond, and usually won't cause wrinkling, curling, or shrinking. But most brands either are not acid-free, or they contain other chemicals that will discolor photos and papers over time.* Also, its bond can weaken with age. Rubber cement can be applied in a few different ways to make it more or less repositionable. The easiest way is to cover both surfaces that are being glued, and then let them dry before putting them together. To dilute or clean up rubber cement, use a thinner (i.e., Bestine).
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